Krabtastic I.'.I.'. high on Anarchy

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Santa Claus

Whenever I talk about egrigores, I inevitably bring up Santa Claus - despite the St. Nicholas origins almost everyone is most familiar with Santa being popularized in advertising and as a kind of secular religious figure for kids.

So, being magicians, why not Santa? He's got a prominent position on the collective unconscious, many of us at one time believed in the character, and he grants wishes!

Comments

  • He is being fed to the unsuspecting children by the unknowing Parent Magi. We do a ritual to bring him to our homes every year (milk and cookies), well, I didn't, but I was raised jewish. It's sad to see all the jewish children who also believe in Santa because of the media. My brother told me he was anti-Semitic, although my parents immediately said he didn't exist when questioned.

  • I don't know if 'The Chaos Cookbook' (ed D J Lawrence) is available any more, but I wrote an invocation of Santa in that book.

    Anyway, since pre-Christian Northern European children used to leave boots full of carrots out for Odin's horse Sleipnir, who would gratefully swap them for treats and presents (the origin kids hanging stockings and leaving food for Santa's reindeer), and Odin in his winter spirit guise was known as 'Old Nick' (later adopted as a moniker of the Devil), one has to wonder exactly how 'christian' saint Nick really is...

  • On a quite different note, but still slightly relevant, my parents gave me the entirety of Grant Morrison's the Invisibles for Hanukah. The whole series together is a hypersigil. Anyway, back to Santa.

    Even before Christianity hit northern Europe, a santa figure existed, as Anton said. My parents are danish jews and my grandparents still had them do what is considered "christmas" traditions. It's more of a cultural than a religious thing there, it has just been absorbed into xtianity.

  • I rather enjoyed The Invisibles. Good present to get. For completeness sake, I highly recommend also getting hold of the Promethea series by Alan Moore. I think I enjoyed the latter more, but I found both quite inspiring.

    Interesting what you say about Santa in Jewish families. Catholics were able to absorb many pagan gods by creating equivalent Saints, thus allowing assimilated peoples an 'official' way to continue celebrating their traditions. Judaism doesn't seem to have gone for the assimilative approach, prefering to teach itself to descendants only, so I guess it never needed such a technique. But I guess as secular traditions replace the religious, such distinctions slowly disappear... ^-^

  • I rather enjoyed The Invisibles. Good present to get. For completeness sake, I highly recommend also getting hold of the Promethea series by Alan Moore. I think I enjoyed the latter more, but I found both quite inspiring.

    Interesting what you say about Santa in Jewish families. Catholics were able to absorb many pagan gods by creating equivalent Saints, thus allowing assimilated peoples an 'official' way to continue celebrating their traditions. Judaism doesn't seem to have gone for the assimilative approach, prefering to teach itself to descendants only, so I guess it never needed such a technique. But I guess as secular traditions replace the religious, such distinctions slowly disappear... ^-^

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